Tough vehicle insurance laws now in place

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In an attempt to clamp down on drivers that are uninsured more restrictive car insurance rules were put into effect by the government. Starting Monday drivers have to declare their car off the road if they do not want to insurance it. Before offenders had to be caught driving without insurance to be prosecuted. Those drivers deemed to have been found uninsured will be sent a letter of warning followed up by a £100 penalty.

If there is no change in the status of the car it can then be clamped, seized and destroyed or the owner could receive up to a £1000 fine. Enforcement action should start from mid July. There are over 1.4 million vehicles in the UK uninsured compared to 34 million that are insured. This may affect which car insurance many people choose as some features, like with the current Aviva insurance offer, insure against being hit by an uninsured driver. Car insurance companies will have to think about how to make their insurance features more attractive with this new rule in mind.

The Department of Transport says over 23,000 are injured and over 160 killed each year by uninsured motorists. Malcolm Tarling of Association of British Insurers said uninsured driving in the UK is serious saying more than 4% are not insured. It is proven that not only are they more apt to cause accidents they also increase insurance premiums for everyone else that have insurance.

They warned that offenders caught under the law will get a criminal record as well as have to pay higher for their insurance. The DVLA, Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency will work to identify non complaint drivers with the Motor Insurers Bureau. The two groups launched an ad campaign over a month ago to heighten awareness of the changes to the law.

Any driver who may have doubts about their insurance status can check it online to see if they appear on data base for motor insurance used to identify offenders. Those who wish to stop paying for insurance must issue a statutory off road notification to the DVLA.

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